Australian Screen

Australia’s audiovisual heritage online

All titles produced by Efftee Film Productions

20 titles - sorted alphabetically or by year

A

Athol Tier as Napoleon historical – c1931

Athol Tier’s performance as Napoleon was one of the many routines filmed for the Efftee Entertainers series of variety shorts.

C

Catching Crocodiles documentary – 1933

If you’ve ever wanted to catch a crocodile, this nine-minute instructional video tells you how, 1930s style.

D

Diggers feature film – 1931

Pat Hanna first told stories from his time in World War I as part of a travelling comedy troupe, then adapted the material into film.

E

Efftee Film Productions Congratulates Miss Dorothy Fricke newsreel – 1931

This silent newsreel item shows the debutante celebration of Miss Dorothy Fricke, held at Chelsea Memorial Hall in Melbourne on 24 August 1931.

Efftee Studio Opening in Melbourne: Speech by Frank Forde historical – 1931

This short film from 1931 records the opening of Frank Thring Senior’s Efftee Film Studios and the screening of the first ‘all-Australian talkie program’. Forde expresses optimism about the future of Australian film making, with a positive impact on local jobs and the presentation of ‘typical Australian characters’ onscreen.

F

FW Thring Introduces the Stars advertisement – 1931

In this short introductory speech, Thring proudly announces to the audience that the film program they are about to see is completely Australian made.

G

George Wallace: Australia’s Premier Comedian historical – 1931

This screen test by seasoned vaudeville comic George Wallace led to roles in several feature films.

H

Harmony Row feature film – 1933

George Wallace’s talent for physical comedy is fully evident in the boxing match which serves as the film’s climax.

His Royal Highness feature film – 1932

The performance of George Wallace, star and writer, is a road map of comic techniques from the passing vaudeville era.

J

Jack O’Hagan: Vocalist Composer historical – 1931

Multi-talented artist Jack O’Hagan performs five songs for Frank Thring’s series of variety shorts, Efftee Entertainers, including 'The Road to Gundagai’.

M

Melbourne Chinese Orchestra Selections historical – 1931

Melbourne’s Chinese Orchestra perform at His Majesty’s Theatre as part of Frank Thring’s Efftee Entertainers.

Melbourne Today documentary – 1931

Probably the first ‘talkie’ documentary made about Melbourne – in 1931, films with sound were still relatively new in Australia.

Miss Minnie Love in Impressions: Maurice Chevalier historical – c1931

Australian performer Minnie Love mimics the popular French comedian and singer Maurice Chevalier for Frank Thring’s Efftee Entertainers series.

P

Provincial Cities of Australia: Ballarat, Victoria documentary – c1932

Frank Thring was an enthusiastic supporter of talking pictures and a great believer in their potential to bolster the Australian film industry.

S

Stan Ray and George Moon Jnr: Specialty Dancers historical – 1931

Entertainers Stan Ray and George Moon Jnr perform a tap dancing routine on one of the stages inside His Majesty’s Theatre in Melbourne.

T

Talkie Season Opens: Wintergarden Theatre historical – c1929

The Wintergarden Theatre was the first suburban cinema to install audio technology to screen talkies.

Tatler News No 2, Dr Maloney MLA newsreel – c1934

Dr Maloney expresses concerns about social injustice and poverty, addresses women’s voting rights and approves removing the word 'illegitimate’ from the birth registry.

Tatler Social Newsreel: Social Party in South Yarra newsreel – c1934

Only a few Efftee newsreels have survived and this one is a vivid record of Melbourne society at play in the 1930s, complete with a society party in South Yarra.

A Ticket in Tatts feature film – 1934

George Wallace helps a champion horse to avoid crooks and win a big race.

V

Victorian Police Radio Patrol sponsored film – c1931

This short dramatised scenario from 1931 demonstrates how wireless technology and morse radio clearly improve the ability of Victorian police to do their jobs.